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·舟山詩詞·淘海洗玉集 – My Poems, and etc.

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Big Four Ice Mountain

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行香子·夏入雪峰

高嶺重巒,暑氣消殘。
 水窮處,野趣營盤。
松林花徑,光影斑斕。
看冬凝玉,
 春流澗,
 夏成潭。
  

地聚峰連,古化熔岩。
 千年雪,陸海奇緣。
山陰背後,滴水洞前。
數四冰窟,
 兩坡綠,
 一天藍。

2014.07.12. Granite Falls

♥ 參見:行香子詞譜

Download or see photo albums @

Big 4 Mountain and Ice Caves
Granite Falls, WA
Clearview

And more other albums:

Boathill (Skydrive)
Boathill (Picasa Web)
Boathill (Flickr)
CursorWorld
Divertida LZ (Panoramio)
Holiday Albums
China Albums
Domestic US Albums
Flickr Album Sets
Divertida LZ (Skydrive Albums)
Lin@Bates

See blogs and sites at

Boathill Poetry
Divertida LZ (Blogspot)
Divertida (wordpress)
We-Heart-It
Facebook
Twitter

Written by Boathill

2014-07-12 at 19:00

Ya’an

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水調歌頭·雅安

  春四月,自綿陽過平樂鎮、
  入上里,至雅安,隨建峰、
  瑶、琳并其同學舊友燕華
  共餐,复返青衣江畔品茶
  觀夜景,暢談而别。


四月古茶道,十里菜花田。
深山水潤村寨,橋下碧溪漣。
青瓦青磚石鼓,金字金絲楠木,
雕坊捲飛檐。
綠氧森森海,
鷺鳥在雲間。

雅雨绵,雅女倩,雅魚鮮。
酒香鹵腊,麻團脆餅米糕黏。
白藕白湯鴨骨,紅笋紅油豆腐,
小宴賽新年。
待客砂鍋煲,
品茗夜江邊。

2014.04.16.

♥ 參見:水調歌頭詞譜

Written by Boathill

2014-04-16 at 23:00

Posted in , 诗作, Poem, Poems

Tagged with , , ,

Rainy Night

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臨江仙·春雨


雲暗芳園失翠色,
隱約霧裡湖山。
東風送暖又歸寒。
碎簷春雨夜,
想起有晴天。

  
或恐牽懷驚睡夢,
孤窗默數更殘。
絲絲縷縷付詩函。
幾行相思句,
燈下苦參研。

2014.03.28. Sammamish

♥ 參見:临江仙詞譜

Written by Boathill

2014-03-28 at 07:00

Spring Clouds

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賀新涼·看雲【今韻】


蔚海空凝目。
仰天河,雲舒雲卷,似煙如霧。
透徹深邃藍無底,
伸手清涼可觸。
微細覺、絲絲雨沐。
難信俗身仍朽立,
霎時間、心在高穹處。
眼欲眩,身臨瀑。
  


西城小住年十數。
往来回,月升日落,歷經朝暮。
碌碌晨光都看過,
別樣今春風物。
隨境轉、重溫感悟。
暖照影中花偎樹,
化相思、眼里動明楚。
一葉草,有瑩露。

2014.03.27. Redmond

♥ 參見:賀新郎詞譜

Written by Boathill

2014-03-27 at 12:30

Lovesickness

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賀新涼·小別【今韻·略取稼軒句】


望斷天如墨。
讓絲絲,
離情化雨,
別愁飄落。
此去東行冰雪地,
冷暖剎時交錯。
祗留下、淒清蕭索。
不恨相思天氣惡,
恨相思天氣無顏色。
遠有念,
最難舍。



胸中自比豪狂客。
倩詩心、
長歌一曲,
視空寬闊。
記得曾經溫存語,
秒秒分分數過。
重聚後,履約成諾。
非羨人生多歡樂,
知歡樂唯共你和我。
俩擁坐,
看雲朵。

2014.03.26. Redmond

♥ 參見:賀新郎詞譜

Written by Boathill

2014-03-26 at 20:00

Spring Equinox

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行香子·春分


貪看春光,滿目芬芳。
 湛藍天,深海之窗。
青松翠溢,櫻樹姿揚。
讓花心醉,
 草新綠,
 人新妝。
  

經雨風霜,生命徜徉。
 雪連山,薄霧微茫。
斑駁斜影,詩意深藏。
願雲留住,
 歲流金,
 水流長。

2014.03.20. Redmond

♥ 參見:行香子詞譜

Written by Boathill

2014-03-20 at 12:30

English Poetry

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This is from my study notes.

♥ By Robert Herrick (1591–1674)

Gather ye rosebuds while ye may,
Old Time is still a-flying:
And this same flower that smiles to-day

To-morrow will be dying.
The glorious lamp of heaven, the sun,
The higher he’s a-getting,
The sooner will his race be run,
And nearer he’s to setting.

♥ By Samuel Taylor Coleridge

The fair breeze blew, the white foam flew,
The furrow followed free;
We were the first that ever burst
Into that silent sea.

♥ Poetry Meter

In poetry, a unit of stressed and unstressed syllables is called a foot. For example, look at this line from Shakespeare: “No longer mourn for me when I am dead.” The rhythm is, “bah-BAH bah-BAH bah-BAH bah-BAH bah-BAH. We read it like this: “no LON-ger MOURN for ME when I am DEAD.” The type of foot Shakespeare used here is called an iamb (抑扬格,短长格).

  • An iamb or an iambic foot has the rhythm bah-BAH. An unstressed syllable, then a stressed one. The iamb is the most common kind of foot in English poetry.
  • The trochee or trochaic foot is the opposite of an iamb — the rhythm is BAH-bah, like the words “apple,” and “father.”
  • The anapest or anapestic foot sounds like bah-bah-BAH, like the words “underneath” and “seventeen.”
  • The dactyl or dactylic foot the opposite of an anapest — the rhythm is BAH-bah-bah,” like the the words “elephant” and “stepmother.”
  • If there are two feet per line, it’s called dimeter. Here’s a sentence in trochaic dimeter: “Eat your dinner.” BAH-bah (1) BAH-bah (2).
  • Three feet per line = trimeter. Here’s a sentence in iambic trimeter: “I eat the bread and cheese.” Bah-BAH (1) bah-BAH (2) bah-BAH (3).
  • Four feet per line = tetrameter. Here’s a sentence in trochaic tetrameter: “Father ordered extra pizza.” BAH-bah (1) BAh-bah (2) BAH-bah (3) BAh-bah (4).
  • Five feet per line = pentameter. Here’s a sentence in iambic pentameter: “I’ll toast the bread and melt a piece of cheese.” Bah-BAH (1) bah-BAH (2) bah-BAH (3) bah-BAH (4) bah-BAH (5).
  • Six feet per line = hexameter or Alexandrine. A sentence in iambic hexameter: “I’ll toast the bread and melt a piece of cheese, okay?” Bah-BAH (1) bah-BAH (2) bah-BAH (3) bah-BAH (4) bah-BAH (5) bah-BAH (6).
  • Seven feet per line = heptameter. …

♥ Meter and Rhythm

  • None of us talk like robots. We give certain words and sounds more emphasis than others in a sentence, depending on a number of factors including the meaning of the words and our own personal speaking style. So not all of the stressed syllables have the same amount of stress, etc.
  • We pause at the ends of ideas or the ends of sentences, even if these occur partway through a poetic line. So this creates a rhythmically variation. When the sentence ends or has a natural pause in the middle of a line of poetry, that’s called a caesura.
  • Poets vary meter or make exceptions in order to create desired rhythmic effects.

See How to Write Poetry.

Written by Boathill

2014-03-12 at 22:00

Posted in , Poems, study notes

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